adventure, thought

loose ends::

IMG_1268

IMG_1274

IMG_1277

IMG_1278

 

IMG_1289

IMG_1294A quick trip home never hurt anyone. While I may have fallen in love with New York City many years ago, this skyline will forever be home. Twelve year old me would be disappointed in twenty-one year old me. I used to have a very large streak of wanderlust turned dwell-lust. I wanted to live anywhere and everywhere at once. Now I’m realizing that having an anchor is a blessing.

So if I’m being honest, the older I get, the happier I am that I have a singular place to call home — one where streets and people are familiar, soaked in memories and hopes.

PS – I’m so glad to have caught the last day of the Ai Weiwei show at the Hirshhorn. He’s a really fabulous & prolific artist.

Standard
adventure

Shanghai ::: part one, the loose ends


One of the things that I teeter between loving & hating is surprises. I love them if I don’t know they are waiting for me. I hate them if I realize they are impending, and I hate/love them when I know what they are. So, while I like to figure out (and therefore) ruin surprises for myself, I refuse to subject you to such torture. However, it’s a dilemma…because I’ve just told you that there is now a surprise, and so you may begin to hate this post without knowing what the surprise is.

To begin on a sour note, and to take you out of your misery (I am going to tell you the surprise) I can’t post many photos from the trip since I will be using them in a different project, which will also be online.  To begin on an even sourer note, that surprise wasn’t a good one. Yet, such is life.

However, I’ve shared some of the small found things that were scattered about here & there, and I hope that suffices for now. There will be a few other posts with pictures that won’t be included in the project.

Shanghai was a magical city, wrapped in a cozy gray blanket of smoke, smog, ashes, and spit. The sidewalks were lined with achingly beautiful trees, the people were incredibly welcoming, the architecture and landscaping were amazing (the buildings make NYC’s look like babies, and the fact that they plant and replant blooming flowers throughout the middle of winter is so impractical, and yet so lovely), the streets were impeccably clean (not a single piece of bubble gum to be found! in a city of 20 million!), the subway was extremely well-organized and traveler-friendly, and the food tasted of home (well, sort of. It was mostly Mandarin cooking, and my family is Cantonese… so I wasn’t accustomed to the abundance of noodles/fried goods/noodles/seafood/noodles. Cantonese cuisine typically has more vegetables and meat).

Here are some loose-end photos, none of which are exactly related to one another. Most of them were taken in Tianzifang, a charming maze of alleyways that snake about this-way and that, and which I swear is the Twilight Zone and/or a black hole and/or Bermuda’s Triangle. Others were taken in the hotel room and random locations throughout the French Concession, which is on the Puxi side of the river. I would recommend staying near the Dapuqiao subway stop if you ever visit since there is quite a bit around that area.
IMG_0063

IMG_0093

IMG_0064

IMG_0310

IMG_0352

IMG_0357

IMG_0343

IMG_0158

IMG_0203

Standard